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     Illustrated Principles of Good Planning

The Miami 21 Zoning Code incorporates time-tested planning principles into the zoning regulations of our City. These are the principles that make for better neighborhoods, open spaces, civic spaces, revitalize areas, and foster economic growth. Many of these  same principles are found in the current planning trends explained in this site.

The animated illustrations below explain these concepts.                   Download a print version

 
Transforming Blank Walls  


An inactive street can be transformed by removing large blank walls and creating a walkable, active street with frequent entrances and windows.

  The addition of frequent windows and doors provide improved safety by having more “eyes on the street”.
  Increased landscaping and open space further enhance the walkability of this pedestrian area and provide environmental benefits.
 

 

    Urban Infill Redevelopment  
 

Vacant lots and large, vast open intersections can be transformed into walkable, urban alternatives. This slide illustrates the redevelopment of parcels utilizing Smart Growth principles.

  Open space and public space should be oriented to the pedestrian. Features such as crosswalks, improved streetscapes make for a much more enjoyable street.
  Designing buildings that are oriented towards the street and hide parking and loading sections boost the activity of the neighborhood and help stimulate pedestrian activity and help set the framework for economic redevelopment.

Turning Development Outward  
 

Inwardly focused, self-contained private designs can be transformed into contributing elements through the creation vibrant neighborhood streets.

  The addition of landscaping and organized public open space creates a walkable pedestrian area.
  Mixed-use neighborhood centers create opportunities for jobs, provide neighborhood services within walking distance for residents, and create opportunities for transit to link nodes of neighborhood centers. Notice the ground floor of this development is now both residential and commercial (retail storefronts) now, as are the buildings across the street.

 

 
Mixed-Use Corridors with Transit  

 

Mixed-use neighborhood corridors with medium densities provide jobs, neighborhood services, live-work options, and transit opportunities—all within walking distance of one another. In this example the transportation corridor goes from just being a way to get to a destination—to a destination in-and-of itself.

  Large, blank walls are replaced with buildings that offer pedestrian-oriented frontages creating mixed- use streets.
  Enhancing the architectural detail and building at a human scale provides an inviting space for people and builds neighborhood character.
  The addition of landscaping and organized public open space creates a walkable pedestrian area.
  Transportation corridors provide opportunities for adding alternative modes of transportation and new and varied alternatives for housing.

 

Building Communities  


Abandoned industrial corridors can be revitalized into communities. 

One-way commercial / industrial corridors can be transformed into a walkable / bicycle friendly two-way street.
  Wide sidewalks with clearly defined crosswalks, bike lanes, and transit shelters create safer streets for pedestrians.
  Enhancing the architectural building and detail at a human scale creates an inviting space for people and promotes neighborhood character.
  The addition of landscaping and organized public open space creates a walkable pedestrian area.
 Allowing for a mixed-use residential and commercial live/work on ground floor-- fosters economic opportunity and provides new housing options.

Neighborhood Main Street  
 

Automobile-oriented commercial corridors can be revitalized into mixed-use neighborhood Main Streets.

Enhancing the streetscape to create clear pedestrian crosswalks, wide sidewalks, and vibrant landscaping transforms the street from an automobile-centered transit corridor, to a pedestrian-oriented Main Street where people want to live, work, and visit.
Allowing a mix of residential and commercial activities creates a main street, fosters economic opportunity, and provides new housing options.
  Enhancing the architectural detail and building at a human scale creates an inviting space for people and creates neighborhood character.
The addition of frequent windows and doors provide improved safety by having more “eyes on the street”.


  

Creating connections  
 

Neighborhood connectors—open places where people congregate informally—help create a sense of place and community.

 A  commercial corridor and strip mall can be transformed into a mixed-use neighborhood street through increased walkways, additional landscaping and open space, and creating connectors such a defined bike/pedestrian multi-use pathway in the street median.
Open spaces and neighborhood connectors create attractive communities that enhance the quality of life, they also provide for alternative modes of quick transport and exercise such as bicycles and rollerblades.

 

  Improved streetscapes and building frontages  


Clean streetscapes can be created with public improvements such as wide sidewalks and parallel parking, and landscaping. Building frontages are also an essential component in the creation of a pedestrian-oriented streetscape.

  In this example, not only are there street improvements on the public realm such as trees and wider sidewalks, but there are also private improvements such as awnings. All of these provide comfort for the pedestrian.
  The addition of parking spaces alongside the road allow for those business to increase their customer base

 

  Parking Garage Liner  


Lining parking garages with well-designed buildings not only provides more opportunities for storefronts and businesses, but also continues the existing neighborhood fabric.

  Lining garages prevents “dead zones” inactive zones along pedestrian-oriented sidewalks.
  Enhancing the architectural detail and building at a human scale creates an inviting space for people and creates neighborhood character.
  The addition of frequent windows and doors provide improved safety by having more “eyes on the street”.
  Note the already existing large sidewalk is underutilized since there are no frontages and storefronts attracting pedestrians.

   
   
 
   
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